Monday, 27 August 2012

New habitat, new bird

This is almost my last post as I leave Juba permanently on 1 September.  There are still a good number of species that should occur here but that I've not found.  One was Plain-backed Pipit, which  occurs in open shortish grassland.  So this morning I was back up the Terekeka road searching the only apparently suitable piece of habitat: a large area from which all the trees have been removed (probably with future construction in mind) and now covered mainly by grasses.  I not only found the pipit - a single bird - but also several Zitting Cisticolas, a species I'd previously seen just once, in January 2011.  Not having found the cisticola since, I was contemplating removing it from my list.  I was able to get a record shot of the cisticola, but not the pipit.

Zitting Cisticola
 
I tramped through a marsh hoping to flush a crake, but no luck.  I did find an odd-looking cisticola that turned out to be juvenile Winding.  Note how different it is from adult Winding photographed back in June.

Juvenile Winding Cisticola
 
Adult Winding Cisticola (June 2012)
 
There were flocks of Fan-tailed Widowbirds, with males not yet in breeding plumage; a beautiful Yellow-crowned Bishop; a Western Banded Snake-Eagle; two Black-bellied Bustards; and in a fig tree, two Eastern Grey Plaintain-eaters, attracting attention with their crazy laughter.

Scruffy-looking male Fan-tailed Widowbird
 
Male Yellow-crowned Bishop
 
Eastern Grey Plantain-eater
 
The main Terekeka road marsh just outside Juba still seems to have too much water to attract herons and waders, but when the water level falls the habitat should become superb (sadly, I'll not be here).

 
Terekeka road marshland

3 comments:

  1. Great that you are still finding new birds even at this late stage in your stay. Will you continue blogging from UK and your new posting?
    Lesley

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Lesley

    I'll do just one final blog this weekend. Otherwise, I'd be happy to post the occasional notes based on any information or photos that you or other people in Juba send me.

    I won't do a blog from my next posting as I'll be unable to birdwatch.

    All the best,

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
  3. https://mobile.facebook.com/neerajg1/albums/10207953519350249/?notif_t=like&ref=m_notif

    Inspired by your work... Pl check

    ReplyDelete